Are you someone that likes to take lots of photos and videos on your iPhone or god forbid, your iPad, at concerts? Your days might well be numbered, as yesterday Apple was granted a patent to prevent users from using their phones to take pictures and videos at inappropriate times, e.g. at concerts when the artist or band you're viewing owns the copyright to their musical performance.

The patent, originally filed in 2011, describes how the camera on your iPhone or iPad could detect an infrared signal which would disable both photography and video recording on the phone or tablet:


‘For example, an infrared emitter can be located in areas where picture or video capture is prohibited, and the emitter can generate infrared signals with encoded data that includes commands to disable the recording functions of devices. An electronic device can then receive the infrared signals, decode the data and temporarily disable the device’s recording function based on the command.’

Apple infrared emitter patent


While those that enjoy viewing concerts through their phone screen might be disappointed, those that don’t will probably be overjoyed. Equally, as pointed out on 9To5Mac, this emitter could prove useful in museums to prevent photography and display information on the individual’s phone screen:

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An infrared emitter can be located near an object and generate infrared signals with encoded data that includes information about that object. An electronic device can then receive the infrared signals, decode the data and display the information about the object to the user.’

Apple infrared emitter patent 2